Two words: Boob Job.

God, I haven’t posted in two weeks!

Two. Weeks.

I was crazy busy, since certain high school teachers like to cram exams before spring break starts. Oof. At least I’m finally on break!

Now, back to business. Last week was actually really cool. I entered the clinic and shadowed a few botox treatments, but things didn’t really get interesting until the very end.

A woman came in who had just recently gotten a boob job.

Boob jobs are very common here in ‘Murica. In fact, they’re the second most common type of plastic surgery, coming in at over 300,000 surgeries a year. That’s crazy.

In Asian countries, boob jobs aren’t as common, but they still occur in significant numbers.

I’d never really seen the aftermath of a fresh boob job. I guess I thought it would be a lot cleaner than the other procedures– maybe with some small stitches, all neatly sewn in and complete.

Well.

It was a lot messier than that. The chest was bound tightly, and a couple drains were attached, collecting blood. The patient was in a little pain, too, but I guess I shouldn’t have expected anything else since¬† she kind of just had surgery.

Dr. Lee was calm and professional throughout the check-up, which was a good thing because I wasn’t exactly calm and professional.

I still have to get used to the immediate aftermath of surgery, or risk being mistaken for a deer in headlights for the rest of my life.

Anyways, despite the messiness, the procedure actually produced great results. Dr. Lee checked up on the condition of the breasts, removed the drainage bags, made sure they were positioned and were developing correctly, and the check-up was complete.

Unfortunately, the patient could hardly move her arms! I helped her get re-dressed and she left the clinic all intact. Woo-hoo! Point one for Maddi.

It’s great how much I’m learning from this internship. I seriously can’t wait until I can watch an actual surgery live in action.

You know, as long as I don’t throw up.

Or almost faint.

Like last time.

Well, hey, I’m getting there! No nausea or sickness from seeing the blood this time. The desensitization must be beginning.

I deserve a special sticker.

So. I almost fainted.

The clinic’s closed today, so I thought I’d do some more recap.

As you probably already learned from the title, I almost fainted a few weeks ago! Go me!

There was one guy who had gotten an otoplasty surgery (the same guy I talked about a couple posts ago). Let’s call him Tim.

So, Tim came in for a post-op appointment, and Dr. Lee removed the bindings around his ear to inspect it. The ear looked…it was…um…less than pleasant. It was very pink and fleshy and a bit gross-looking. But I guess that’s how it was supposed to look, considering, you know, it was recently attacked by needles.

I looked on as Dr.Lee checked Tim’s left ear, lifting it a little to look behind.

Tim began bleeding. A lot.

I passed needles and such to Dr. Lee as he asked for them, but all I could really see was Tim and the blood. He was grimacing in pain and blood kept on dripping down.

I began to feel sick to my stomach. He wasn’t supposed to bleed this much, right? There was something wrong with him, right? RIGHT?!

The room became smaller and smaller. I felt strange, like all the blood in my body was rushing to my head. The room began spinning.

Seriously. If I didn’t get out of there pronto, this was going to be me:

Maddi at her finest.

No exaggeration, there. I really felt like I was going to faint.

Like any self-respecting teenager, I said that I had to go the bathroom and hightailed it out of there.

Unfortunately, getting out of the room didn’t help me at all. I stumbled down the hallway and into the bathroom, but the bathroom was dark.¬† I couldn’t even find the light switch, so I just ended up getting really confused. Groping the walls, I made it back down the hallway.

The nurse, Sharon, finally found me and sat me down with a cup of water before I ended up hurting somebody. It probably looked like this:

But in my mind, it looked more like this:

I swear I could’ve cried in relief. I’d never really felt that way before, so it was a surprisingly scary experience. It was one of the first times I ever felt so out of control of my body. My mind had been completely sound, but my body clumsy and jelly-like.

Fortunately, sitting down and drinking the water helped me considerably. The nausea left my head, leaving it cold and tingling

Meanwhile, Dr. Lee and Sharon had to do an emergency surgery on Tim because something was wrong with his left ear, making it bleed so profusely.

Tim (and I) ended up being perfectly fine. I didn’t faint, and Tim’s surgery went without difficulty. Tim seems to be enjoying his results.

Dr. Lee reassured me later on that feeling lightheaded is perfectly normal. It’s actually the body’s reaction to seeing blood. Even he used to feel that way, but becoming a surgeon desensitized him to it.

Thank God. If I stayed like that forever, I could never be a surgeon. I’d faint on top of my patients in the middle of some life-changing surgery.

It’s nice that Dr. Lee and Sharon are so supportive, though. Imagine if Dr. Lee wasn’t so understanding.

Thank God, Donald Trump isn’t my boss.

Unless.

Unless Dr. Lee is Donald Trump.

Plot twist.